June 13, 2024
Annies Recipes Sweet Amish Pickles

Annies Recipes Sweet Amish Pickles

Pickling is one of the oldest methods of preserving foods, dating back thousands of years. While we may take refrigeration for granted today, people used to rely on pickling as a way to make vegetables and fruits last through the winter months. 

No one knows this better than the Amish community, who have long picked their bountiful garden harvests as a practical way of storage.

In this recipes, we’ll learn how to make annies recipes sweet amish pickles – an easy, tasty way to enjoy the tangy, sour flavor of old-fashioned pickled cucumbers. 

The sweet and sour brine is typical of authentic annies recipes sweet amish pickles. Once you try these, you’ll never go back to store-bought! 

An Introduction to Annies Recipes Sweet Amish Pickles

The Amish people lead a traditional, rural lifestyle that revolves around family, farming, and faith. They eat hearty, home-cooked meals using ingredients grown or produced on their farms. Amish cuisine is humble yet wholesome, featuring dishes like pot pies, roasted meats, thick soups, homemade bread, and preserved produce.

Pickling is hugely popular in Amish cooking, as a means to make use of ripe garden vegetables and enjoy them all winter long. Some common pickled Amish foods include cucumbers, beets, green beans, peaches, eggs, and meat. 

The Amish people’s penchant for pickling traces back to the 18th and 19th centuries when refrigeration was not an option.

Annies recipes sweet amish pickles represents the essence of this tradition. The sweet and sour brine provides a taste of summer, even during the cold winter months when fresh cucumbers are out of season.

Overview of Annies Recipes Sweet Amish Pickles

Bread and butter pickles refer to a type of sweet-and-sour pickled cucumber that originated right here in the United States. 

They are called “bread and butter” pickles because their versatility makes them a staple accompaniment, like bread and butter, to many dishes.

Unlike other pickled cucumbers with intense vinegar flavors, bread and butter pickles feature a nicely balanced sweetness and acidity. They lend a satisfying crunch and tangy zing to everything from grilled meats to burgers and sandwiches.

The Annies recipes sweet amish pickles shared here can be eaten right away or canned for enjoyment all year long. The procedures are easy enough for beginner home cooks. Let’s review the simple ingredients and steps!

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Annies Recipes Sweet Amish Pickles

Servings: Yields 1 quart

Total Time: 10 minutes prep, 5 minutes cooking

Difficulty: Beginner

Ingredients

  • 1 pound pickling cucumbers
  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • 1⁄2 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon celery seeds

Equipment Needed

  • Mixing bowl
  • Spoon
  • Quart jar with lid
  • Knife
  • Cutting board
  • Measuring cups
  • Measuring spoons
  • Pot with lid
  • Canning funnel (optional)

Step-by-Step Annies Recipes Sweet Amish Pickles Cooking Instructions

Follow these simple steps for deliciously sweet and sour Amish pickles:

  1. Wash the cucumbers. Rinse 1 pound of small, fresh pickling cucumbers under running water. Scrub gently to remove any dirt or debris.
  1. Trim and slice. Trim off the ends and cut the cucumbers into 1/4-inch slices. Add the sliced cucumbers to a large mixing bowl.
  2. Prepare the brine. In a small bowl, stir together 1 cup white vinegar, 1⁄2 cup sugar, 1 Tbsp kosher salt, 1⁄2 tsp mustard seeds, and 1⁄2 tsp celery seeds until combined. Pour the brine over the cucumber slices.
  1. Marinate. Let the cucumber slices marinate in the brine for about 5 minutes. Stir occasionally so the brine coats all of the slices evenly.
  1. Transfer to a jar. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the cucumber slices into a clean, 1-quart jar or canning jar, leaving about 1/2 inch of headspace. Pour the remaining brine over top.
  1. Seal and store. Wipe the rim of the jar, attach the lid tightly, and store in the refrigerator. The Amish pickles taste best chilled overnight before serving. Enjoy within 3 months.

And that’s it! With these 6 simple steps, you’ll have crisp, tasty bread and butter pickles ready in no time at all. Adjust the sugar and spices to your taste for the perfect sweet and sour flavor.

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Annies Recipes Sweet Amish Pickles

Recipe by Tasty FundaCourse: Blog
Servings

1

Quart
Prep time

10

minutes
Cooking time

5

minutes
Calories

15

kcal
Total time

15

minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 pound pickling cucumbers

  • 1 cup white vinegar

  • 1⁄2 cup sugar

  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt

  • 1⁄2 teaspoon mustard seeds

  • 1⁄2 teaspoon celery seeds

Directions

  • Wash the cucumbers. Rinse 1 pound of small, fresh pickling cucumbers under running water. Scrub gently to remove any dirt or debris.
  • Trim and slice. Trim off the ends and cut the cucumbers into 1/4-inch slices. Add the sliced cucumbers to a large mixing bowl.
  • Prepare the brine. In a small bowl, stir together 1 cup white vinegar, 1⁄2 cup sugar, 1 Tbsp kosher salt, 1⁄2 tsp mustard seeds, and 1⁄2 tsp celery seeds until combined. Pour the brine over the cucumber slices.
  • Marinate. Let the cucumber slices marinate in the brine for about 5 minutes. Stir occasionally so the brine coats all of the slices evenly.
  • Transfer to a jar. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the cucumber slices into a clean, 1-quart jar or canning jar, leaving about 1/2 inch of headspace. Pour the remaining brine over top.
  • Seal and store. Wipe the rim of the jar, attach the lid tightly, and store in the refrigerator. The Amish pickles taste best chilled overnight before serving. Enjoy within 3 months.

Serving Suggestions for Sweet Pickled Cucumbers

There are so many versatile ways to enjoy these quick Amish pickles:

  • Slice them up to top hamburgers or hot dogs
  • Serve as a crunchy side with grilled chicken or ribs
  • Add them to sandwiches and wraps for a tangy crunch
  • Toss into green salads or pasta salads
  • Garnish charcuterie or cheese boards
  • Eat them straight out of the jar for a satisfying snack!

Their sweet and sour taste provides a nice contrast to fatty or salty foods. The pickling brine gives them a longer shelf life so you can enjoy pickled cucumbers year round.

Nutrition Benefits of Pickles

Pickles offer some healthy perks, despite their association with salty, sugary snacks. Here are some of the nutrition highlights:

  • They are very low in calories at around just 5-15 calories per spear. The salty brine gives flavor without lots of extra calories or fat.
  • Pickles provide a modest amount of Vitamin K. Our bodies need vitamin K for proper blood clotting.
  • The good bacteria formed during fermentation offers probiotic benefits for gut health.
  • Pickles can help meet daily sodium needs in moderation. Their salt and vinegar content drives electrolyte absorption.

So savor pickled cucumbers guilt-free! The small serving sizes make it easy to incorporate their nutrition benefits as part of a balanced diet.

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A History of Pickling As a Preservation Method

Pickling and preserving methods like those used in this Amish bread and butter pickle recipe have an extensive global history. Let’s explore some pickle past:

  • 2400 BC – Pickling is first practiced in ancient Mesopotamia.
  • 1200s AD – Pickled foods gain popularity in Europe during the Middle Ages.
  • 16th Century – Mariners store pickled foods like lime, onion, and cucumber to prevent scurvy on long voyages.
  • 1830s – German immigrants introduce cucumber pickling traditions to America.
  • 1870s – The invention of canning jars advanced pickling methods for longer storage.
  • 1920s – USDA publishes guidelines for home canning and preserving pickled produce.
  • Today – Pickled goods like olives, sauerkraut, kimchi, and pickles remain popular around the world!

Pickling allowed people to enjoy vegetables long after the harvest season ended. The Amish community still heavily relies on these traditional food preservation techniques.

FAQs About Sweet Amish Pickles Recipe

Here are answers to some common questions about annies recipes sweet amish pickles :

What are the best cucumbers to use? 

Smaller pickling cucumbers work best, rather than large slicing cucumbers. The smaller ones make uniform slices with thin skins that absorb the brine well.

How long will the pickled cucumbers last? 

Properly stored in the refrigerator, the pickles will maintain optimal flavor and texture for about 3 months.

Can I adjust the sweetness? 

Yes, you can add more or less sugar to suit your tastes. Start with 1/2 cup and tweak it each batch.

What other vegetables can I pickle this way?

 Many firm veggies work well, like carrots, cauliflower, pearl onions, green beans, and asparagus. Adjust brine proportions as needed.

Should I process and can them for shelf stability? 

You can certainly can the pickles using a water bath canner for long-term pantry storage according to USDA guidelines. Always use proper sterile equipment and procedures.

Please let me know if you have any other pickle questions! I’m happy to provide more details on pickling methods, shelf life, and recipe adjustments.

Conclusion

For a taste of old-fashioned Amish cooking, be sure to try your hand at making annies recipes sweet amish pickles. The simple 6-step recipe yields tasty pickled cucumbers with the perfect balance of tangy, salty, and sweet flavors.

Preserve the summer harvest or make them any time of year. Explore different spice variations to customize your own signature Amish pickles. Enjoy them as a crunchy, crave-worthy snack or let their versatile

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